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Sweaty Betty blog: Tennis

Empowering Women Through Fitness

Tennis Ambassador Emily Webly-Smith's 7 Top Training Tips

posted on Tuesday, 11th June 2013by Sweaty Betty | 0 Comments

In anticipation of Wimbledon, we asked Sweaty Betty Ambassador and professional tennis player Emily Webley-Smith to give us some training tips. Born in Bristol, Emily is currently ranked number 6 in Britain and has competed in four Wimbledon Championships. Here are her top 7 tips for perfecting your play court-side.
 
1. Be comfortable
Choose kit that you can move in and don't have to adjust while you play. The Deuce Tennis Vest and Match Play Tennis Skirt will be my choice at Wimbledon this summer for the perfect combination of freedom of movement and style. The skirt even has built in shorts so rhythm between serves isn’t disturbed with a search for the second ball.
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Iconic Wimbledon Style

posted on Wednesday, 22nd June 2011by Sweaty Betty | 0 Comments
Key looks of Wimbledon through the ages.


Favoured by the British aristocracy tennis became popular in the 1860s. Played in corsets and long skirts, there was little difference between a lady’s daywear and her activewear (we can’t imagine what that would be like!).
 
Like Sweaty Betty, Claire McCardell was flying the style and performance flag, but in 1960 where many refuted her view that women should look good but also be able to move!
 
Take the time to enjoy our fashion timeline showing key looks – from Gussy Moran wearing lace trimmed ‘panties’ and causing a frenzy, to Andre Agassi returning to Wimbledon after his stand on colour freedom for his tennis apparel, and finally to Nadal and Federer taking their rivalry from court to kit!


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Style On Court

posted on Thursday, 24th June 2010by Tamara | 0 Comments

Style on court continued... Style of play is not the only thing on a player’s mind this tournament, or those gone before. What about the all important question ‘what to wear?’ A look back into the history of the Wimbledon wardrobe...

In 1985 Anne White strolled onto court, warming up in a tracksuit. Nothing to be noted here. As play began and both women took their place on court, White revealed her outfit: off with the tracksuit and out came an all in one skin tight cat suit! Play began to the dismay of crowd and commentator and continued until stopped due to weather conditions at one set all. Bad light allowed the umpire and officials to have their say regarding style on court: the jumpsuit was deemed unsuitable and White was asked not to wear this for the rest of the tournament. White now admits she may have been ahead of her time, sporting a body con all-in-one, I think she may have been right.

Not only did five time Wimbledon champion Suzanne Lenglen reapply her make up at court changeovers, she was also named the ‘the divine one’ by French press – charged with flamboyancy, trend setting and the rise of celebrity in sport. Lenglen wore a daring calf-length, short-sleeved cotton attire with white stockings under her skirt The French tennis icon experimented with wearing colourful skirt chiffon, a headband, and shiny white stockings. Her ‘revolutionary’ tennis attire caused a stir on the tennis court as spectators were used to the modest, and toned down attire of female tennis players. She also won 25 grand slam titles between 1919 and 1926. Wow. 

Up until 91, Andre Agassi imposed upon himself a Wimbledon ban. He was a man where style came first, a man of colour and panache although Wimbledon did prove too tempting post 91 where Agassi lay down his fashion gauntlet for the white Wimbledon policy. Clearly the man where style came first…. Did someone say denim?!

 

The William’s sisters do respect the demure white ruling of Wimbledon but credit must go to the gutsy outfits Serena has showcased in the past – like this PVC black catsuit.

 

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